GiveWell is not an Index Fund.

Someone1 on facebook recently asked

Can we think of donating to GiveWell- or GWWC-recommended charities as being the philanthropic analogue of investing in an index fund? In the sense that it may be possible in principle to do better, but it’s close to the best among readily available options, and almost everybody who tries to do better will do worse.

I think this analogy overlooks some important points about the underlying structure.

An Index contains all the stocks that satisfy some very broad criteria – for example, the S&P500 is basically “is very large US company”. Index funds invest in all the stocks in a specific index.2 Index funds try to do as well as the index on the whole – no better, no worse.

Active managers, on the other hand, by small subsets of the stocks in the index, and try to beat the index. That is, they try to buy stocks that will do better than the average stock in the index.

Part of the appeal of index funds is that many people think that all stocks have basically equally good prospects, ex ante, due to the Efficient Market Hypothesis.There are good reasons to think that free markets are in general very efficient.

Givewell looks at a large number of charities, and selects a very small number to recommend. In this way they’re much more like an active manager than an index fund. An index fund for charities would mean spreading out your donations between thousands of different charities.

There are important differences between the stock market and the charity market. Virtually any time you think you see an inefficiency in the stock market, you are probably wrong. But this does not apply to the charity market. Effective Altruists habitually and credibly claim that there are many orders of magnitude difference between the expected values of different charities (pdf). And the sorts of arguments about risk and diversification that motivate balanced portfolios of investments simply do not apply to charities; with charities, you should pick the best one and donate everything to it.3

Some perhaps Index Funds are Givewell are similar insomuchas they are both good things. But so is chocolate.

This analogy glosses over important differences, and potentially causes sloppy thinking. Just because two things are good doesn’t mean they are good for the same reasons or in the same way. Effective altruists would do well to understand that markets are not like charities. Others would do well to understand the there is no Efficient Charity Hypothesis!


  1. who will remain anonymous until they request otherwise. 
  2. technically some merely invest in representative sub-baskets, but S&P500 indexes probably buy all the constituents. 
  3. unless you are very rich. 
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One thought on “GiveWell is not an Index Fund.

  1. Yes, I think Vipul’s post was really contrasting going with GiveWell rather than picking your own charites, and the analogous contrast to that would be that between amateur stock-picking and investing in a well-chosen fund (which could be an index fund, or actively managed).

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